Quote

Russell’s teapot

Bertrand Russell 1907

Bertrand Russell 1907 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Many orthodox people speak as though it were the business of sceptics to disprove received dogmas rather than of dogmatists to prove them. This is, of course, a mistake. If I were to suggest that between the Earth and Mars there is a china teapot revolving about the sun in an elliptical orbit, nobody would be able to disprove my assertion provided I were careful to add that the teapot is too small to be revealed even by our most powerful telescopes. But if I were to go on to say that, since my assertion cannot be disproved, it is intolerable presumption on the part of human reason to doubt it, I should rightly be thought to be talking nonsense. If, however, the existence of such a teapot were affirmed in ancient books, taught as the sacred truth every Sunday, and instilled into the minds of children at school, hesitation to believe in its existence would become a mark of eccentricity and entitle the doubter to the attentions of the psychiatrist in an enlightened age or of the Inquisitor in an earlier time.

Bertrand Russell

Three species

Morning Birds

The birds are waking up suspiciously before I do lately. They had to have started long before I woke today because there was already that blue twilight that brings to mind the word murky even though the air is clear.

I have long ago decided (so I decide yet again) to refuse to question the words that my brain decides to add to the mix. So murky it is.

Birds (from their calls):

Sorry, three definite bird identifications before full consciousness is all anyone can really ask of me.

And there it is.

Equinox 2013

A very happy Spring Equinox to everyone who happens by.

It’s finally turned into February here. This gray cold misty weather that we have now belongs to February and not to the tail end of March. This weather is what we go to Boulder to avoid.

Our days are twelve and a half hours long now — past the actual definition of Equinox – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: equal night, when the night time is equal to the day time.

This day is, by definition, past the equinox, just. How do I know that? The method that the Catholic Church uses to determine the date of Easter:

Easter Sunday is the first Sunday after the first full moon after the Spring Equinox.

No, I don’t know why they made it that involved and complicated. Probably to keep us hoi polloi stupid. I learned this through having been long ago assigned as homework a program to calculate when Easter would be in any given year. Yes, I did get an A.