What to get me for my next birthday

Via Notebookism:

Review: Field Notes Brand Pocket Notebook:

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Breck shared his opinions of the Field Notes:

“You can see for yourself below how much pride of provenance DDC/CP take in their product. When manufacturers put this all out there, you know they believe in what they’re doing. Sometimes the product is still junk (I’m looking at you, Tom’s of Maine GingerMint toothpaste. Why wait all night to develop morning breath when you can just squeeze it straight from a tube?), but it’s still nice to see sources and methods listed.

Other printing on this book includes absolutely perfectly proportioned and placed blocks to put owner info, record the dates of use, and offer or decline to offer a reward if lost and found…”

Read the full review at his blog.

Cuil is a total failure

I don’t know what made the producers of Cuil (no link on purpose) think they could be a “Google-killer,” but they neglected the part wherein their product actually has to work.

This morning, I tried searching on “esophageal cancer” to see what it would turn up. I got lists of “links” in certain categories; the categories were rather appropriate to the search. But, the links weren’t links. I had to go to a sub-page if I wanted the links to be clickable.

Here was the problem. Clicking on a link to a sub-page sent my browser into hijacked purgatory. I not only didn’t get the page of links, but got sent to those spurious sorts of pages that tell you that you have viruses, and would you like to buy their virus detection software?

I’ll not be going back to Cuil. Not unless I feel like being ad-spammed again.

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The night outside

The night outside is ringing like a bell, thanks to the grasshoppers and crickets. The night air is warmer than I am used to it, or have been used to it in past summers.

The sun is down an hour earlier than it had been down at the height of summer, when I was still thawing out from this very cold past spring, when I never thought I’d be warm again, when I had pneumonia without even knowing it. Now I am warm again, and I have my windows open for the warmth. And the sounds.

I’d turn on the air conditioner, just to keep everything in the house from smelling of mildew, but I can’t quite bring myself to doing that just yet.

Enough about depressing things

You do learn to say that to yourself, and I think this is a major step forward for a cancer survivor. I know I had to say it today several times before the small moth-like anxieties fled.

Then there was a horrible show that I slurped right up on E! TV about stars’ mental problems. I felt so home there with Gwyneth Paltrow going through the “baby blues” as they’ve come to be called. I can just imagine us hittin’ back on the Prozac, side by side. …..Not, but it did the trick.

I’m now in command of my self…. All dressed up and nowhere to go.

Now playing on iTunes: The Unanswered Question from the album “Kosmos” by Isao Tomita

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Farewell: Leroy Sievers

Journalist, ‘My Cancer’ Blogger Leroy Sievers Dies : NPR
Journalist Leroy Sievers, who covered wars, genocides and natural disasters in more than a dozen countries — and who chronicled life after his cancer diagnosis for NPR on-air and online — died Friday. He was 53.

I just went to check on Leroy Sievers’ blog for the weekday-daily update, to find out that he passed away over the weekend. I never knew the man, but the blog had become a familiar place to me, and I made sure that I kept updated with it always. And now he’s gone.

Cancer is definitely another country.

What sort of a citizen am I? One with a daily reprieve? I suppose so, though medical practice and habits of not getting checked up on several times a day makes it so that I get chunks of days’ worth of reprieve. But I’ll take it. I guess you learn as you go on.

Post-heroic?

Patrick Porter, over at OxBlog, writes us a very thoughtful essay about what sort of society we live in — post-heroic, or…? Not to mention, the implications thereof, which spill over into Hollywood.

OxBlog
POST-HEROIC? I’ve always been a little uneasy with the notion that we in the West wage post-heroic war because we live in post-heroic societies.

I reveal my loves

Much as I have grown to love and revere BBEdit as both a program and way of life, and have become an actual card-carrying member of its license holders, I still go to TextMate for my blogly-writing needs. As in all other life, that which you admire is different from that which you use. BBedit may be the grande dame of Macintosh text editors, but it doesn’t have native tools with which I can hack these posts out via a third party package, and publish the post with all the necessary trimmings, like keywords and track-backs as I see fit.

Sure you could make such a thing with BBEdit, but why? I already have what I need in TextMate, and it was installed with the rest of the program. Therefore I use TextMate: it does what I need it to do, and it did so first. So there.

One lesson you have to learn: don’t re-invent the wheel if it’s already been done.

On other fronts, Other Patti and Our Friend Sally have just been over for their accustomed movie night on Sunday nights. I’m glad we have kept this up over the past year, even though I told them that I was healthy at last, at least enough so that they could resume their regular evening lives, and not have to watch TV with me every evening.

We do so now every Sunday evening, because during the process of my recovery, we got to liking the camaraderie of it all, and didn’t want to lose that part. So tonight, we watched Peter Lorre play Mr. Moto. It wouldn’t have occurred to them all to hire an actual Japanese actor to play a Japanese character, though, would it? :/

More food for thought

Or, why you should be careful what you wear, and the mystery of how murderous thugs become fashion statements.

Commentary: T-shirt depicts ‘pathetic and brutal legacy’ – CNN.com

How Che became such a revered superhero of the hard-core left is laughable. First of all, he wasn’t even a good revolutionary. He failed in his attempt at world revolution almost as badly as communism has failed in the places it was actually tried.

“This is a history of a failure” is how he himself described his efforts in the Congo. He was killed in Bolivia, trying to fire up another failure of a war. Earlier, he even managed to drop his gun and shoot himself in the face.

(from Glenn Beck)